February 26, 2000

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Teotihuacán is less than 30 miles outside Mexico City, and is the site of America's oldest and tallest pyramids.  The official site for Teotihuacán is sponsored by Arizona State University (odd, but true).  My dad and I scaled approximately 450 steps during our visit.  

This is the Pyramid of the Sun.  There is a group of girl scouts wearing red on the top closest corner of the pyramid for scale.  It was very nice of them to climb it so I could take this picture.

The Pyramid of the Sun has 248 steps, separated into five sections.  This is the first section.  It appears that the hand-holds on the right would help greatly in climbing, but they frown on that use.

Dad on the top of the Pyramid of the Sun, with the Pyramid of the Moon in the background.  We were to climb it next.

Not yet sunburned, I'm standing at the top of the Pyramid of the Sun.  Many people were gasping for air, but our proud family was feeling quite fit.

After Dad and I purchased matching table cloths from a man who needed to buy chicken for his family, I ran up the Pyramid of the Moon in order to capture this shot.

Dad, not feeling at fit as before, rests at the top of the Pyramid of the Moon.  Fewer people achieve this feat, as the Pyramid of the Sun is closer to the parking lot.  I counted 138 steps on this pyramid.

This is the view from the top of the Pyramid of the Moon.  The Pyramid of the Sun is on the left, and the Avenue of the Dead leads away to the south.

Appearing like a water-color picture, the Pyramid of the Sun is seen through glass panels from inside the museum, with Teotihuacán's floor plan below.

 

Updated June 06, 2003 07:48